Tag Archives: gardening

Come on in!

In my last post I wrote about the importance of passions to happiness or contentment. One of mine which is incredibly satisfying is gardening; that is, making nature beautiful (or more beautiful if you will). I love both the working part and the enjoying part. Creating a gorgeous garden is like creating art and in the end there’s something to look at, just as with a painting or sculpture. It has a calming effect and delights me. Even a small yard can have many charms.

In the fall a large nearby tree came down (it was pretty much dead) and its absence gave me more sun which means brighter flowers and even a crack at vegetable growing (veggies need a lot of sunlight). I think the 2017 yard is the most beautiful it’s been. When I look out I am sometimes taken aback by it. I took these photos on the last day of July.

IMG_20170731_140208

IMG_20170731_140241

MUST have a screen against mosquitoes

 

IMG_20170731_140352

On the right, a fabric shower curtain to block a not great view

IMG_20170731_140200

IMG_20170731_140402

IMG_20170731_140448

IMG_20170731_140512_kindlephoto-1407560

IMG_20170731_140542

IMG_20170731_140551

IMG_20170731_143428_kindlephoto-1188556

Lydia, the one-armed watering girl

IMG_20170731_141118

BASIL!! My favorite

IMG_20170731_143225_kindlephoto-1267139

IMG_20170731_144840_kindlephoto-1059487

The coloring on this moth is fantastic

IMG_20170731_144847_kindlephoto-2995330

IMG_20170731_144735_kindlephoto-3079372

IMG_20170731_144330_kindlephoto-3331328

This is a prize. It’s a dipladenia (an annual flower that’s supposed to die) I bought in summer 2016, wintered inside and brought back out and BAM! Gorgeous again.

IMG_20170731_144619_kindlephoto-3162773

IMG_20170731_143412_kindlephoto-1225202

IMG_20170731_143250

Silver Arrow grass plant, a garden star

IMG_20170731_141240_kindlephoto-2021324

The grass plant kept getting bigger so I dug/wrestled a piece out and potted it

IMG_20170731_144317

IMG_20170731_144549

The Bathing Station (for the birds not me) 2017

IMG_20170731_144601

IMG_20170731_141123

Trying some different basil types, Purple, Thai

IMG_20170731_140625_kindlephoto-1834882

IMG_20170731_144655_kindlephoto-1106546

IMG_20170731_140944

IMG_20170731_140612

IMG_20170731_141137

More basil types, Lemon, lime

IMG_20170731_140606

Tomato attempts

IMG_20170731_140811_kindlephoto-1891552

This guy kept a beady eye on me

IMG_20170731_140758_kindlephoto-1928618

IMG_20170731_140833_kindlephoto-1947492

 

IMG_20170731_144425_kindlephoto-952857

 

IMG_20170731_140740_kindlephoto-1360247

 

Advertisements

Green/White Grass plant (part 2)

The first summer I blogged I posted a photo of this Green/white grass plant. There wouldn’t be any reason to revisit it except that particular post has had somewhat regular views over the last two years. I was confused at first; why would people care about that post? It must come up in searches and that brings people to the blog.

I’ve felt a little guilty about that, thinking if those readers were looking for useful information, they sure weren’t finding any in my post. Granted, it wasn’ t meant to be an informational post full of big Latin words and discussions of soil conditions, but yeesh, I didn’t even say what it was. I’m here to correct that. It’s a Silver Arrrow Grass plant. Grows 5-6′, needs full sun, and gets tall reddish blooms in late summer (which I always forget till I see them).

Here’s also a current photo of this gorgeous plant. Well, two photos. One for “context” and one a little closer. What you won’t see in the photo is dental floss but it’s there. About this time of year the whole plant starts flopping over, perhaps because it doesn’t get as much sun as it wants – I really don’t know –  so I use my go-to garden helper, dental floss, wrapping it around the perimeter once and knotting tightly. (You want to knot it tightly so birds don’t carry the floss away for nest-building. Also I was chastized last year by someone online saying that wildlife could choke on it basically. That sounded far-fetched to me, but I dutifully mention it in case it’s true.)

I love that this beauty basically takes care of itself. No fertilizing, no regularly trimming, just cutting it down in the late Fall when it browns. I remain forever impressed that a giant plant like this can just “disappear” over winter and return again every summer, starting from scratch. It’s like a magic bean!

IMG_20160809_122917.

 

IMG_20160809_122923