Short Thought #283

Recently I’ve been seeing a Neutrogena® TV ad for a product that “fades brown spots” featuring a lovely young woman. The only visible brown spot on this particular woman’s head is her silky brunette hair. This ad reminds me of sooooo many others of similar ilk I’ve seen onscreen and in print, and I wonder, not for the first time, what do ACTUAL old women, women who really DO have brown spots, wrinkles, gray hair, “minor skin imperfections” 😕 and so forth, think when they see 20, 25, 30, or even 35 year olds, touting these kinds of products? Do they bust a gut laughing or does it incense them enough to want to lob a brick through the screen?

25 thoughts on “Short Thought #283

  1. Kate Crimmins

    I laugh and don’t buy the product. Show me a mature woman who uses the product and I’ll consider it. One of our local dermatologists is advocating that women start botox at age 30. When I was 30, I didn’t need anything like that.

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    1. Colette Post author

      God forbid women age in any way.😐 Your thought is mine exactly; show me a proper representation of the actual consumer who might benefit from these products. They recommend Retinol very young too now.

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  2. SD Gates

    Well, considering I have felt fairly invisible since turning 55, when my hair went Elsa (think “Frozen”) white and I gained a few pounds, I honestly don’t worry about any of that. I don’t have “real” TV anymore – haven’t for years, so I don’t have to suffer through those types of ads, but I can tell you, if I did see such ads, I am sure I would be quite irritated and change the channel.

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    1. Colette Post author

      White hair can be beautiful. You are not missing much on TV; the ads are worse than ever with their goals/representations that are unattainable to so many. I talk back to the lovely young woman talking about fading her brown spots: “What brown spots?? What are you, 20?”😁

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    1. Colette Post author

      I had to google that. I’m very fair-skinned so dealing with facial hair has not been an issue but I know it’s a considerable problem for many women.

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      1. Kate Lester

        I agree, and I’m sympathetic to young women who have a problem, but so many young men and women who I work with just jump on any new fad diet or beauty treatment.
        When teenagers start doing it when it’s not really a problem, it’s only going to get worse as they age.

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        1. Colette Post author

          I think it has to be so hard now to be young now and feel that anything less than perfect in any aspect of your life, looks included, isn’t good enough.

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  3. Savoring Sixty and Beyond

    It makes me want to laugh! Really??? I don’t get the way these advertisers think. I am trying to make my entrance to the older age years a little easier by trying to eat right, trying to exercise regularly, and trying not to pay attention to ads such as these.

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    1. Colette Post author

      Smart. There isn’t a lot of money to be made from people who take care of themselves & aren’t easily taken in by fads or “latest things .” 😊 That said, it is hard to get away from ads/thinking like this because it permeates the culture in so many ways.

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  4. Savoring Sixty and Beyond

    I agree with you, it is very hard to get away from these ads/thinking because it is everywhere! I find that as I age, although I still take pride in my appearance and will confess I have been suckered into buying products that just do not work, I am actually getting ok with the way God intends me to look – sags, bags and all! 😂😉

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  5. Sheila Moss

    These commercials don’t aggravate me nearly as much as the ones trying to convince me that old women with brown spots and wrinkles are naturally beautiful and need only their high-priced bees’ wax products, which don’t do a darn thing except make you a waxy old woman.

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  6. markbialczak

    It happens with men’s ads, too, Colette. I think all people should wear their well-earned signs of living life with pride, and I back the words with my male-pattern hair and gray-and-brown beard.

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    1. Colette Post author

      When I see ads for men’s products, the men tend to be more “age appropriate” for the products they’re promoting. It’s a somewhat different topic, but generally I think people should make the most of what they have throughout life. It can depend on their marital/partner status, line of work, etc, how important or not that is to them.

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  7. Maggie Wilson

    you might be too young to remember the ads for dish detergent that showed a mother and daughter comparing hands – because mom used the RIGHT brand, you couldn’t distinguish the elder from the junior. I remember feeling mildly put out by the manipulation, but also drawn to the product. Since then, I prefer to mute the channels, otherwise, bricks be flying, trust me!

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    1. Colette Post author

      Heh, heh! Oh geez, I remember that ad vaguely, you were supposed to guess who was older, right? Clearly from the looks of my “worker hands” I’ve been using the wrong detergent all these years.😕 I do find myself listening to ads unless it’s one I despise from some reason or another. Part of it’s a dark curiosity, often thinking: Did they just say what I think they said?!

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  8. mariezhuikov

    We bust a gut laughing. Kind of reminds me of the Botox ads of yesteryear that encouraged the use of Botox so that women could “express themselves.” Really? Something that freezes your facial muscles helps you express yourself?

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    1. Colette Post author

      Marie, that reminds me of advice I read in a teen mag long ago ( possibly Seventeen?) that suggested girls stop making expressions so they wouldn’t get wrinkles later in life! I hadn’t heard that we should have botox to “express” ourselves. That kind of nonsensical ad copy makes me crazy.😜

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