Growin’ okra

I’m growing okra of all things. I don’t really get enough sun for vegetable growing. Even if things start out ok, they don’t typically prosper. It had never occurred to me to try growing a modestly obscure vegetable like okra, but someone was giving away seeds and since I do love okra, it wasn’t all that strange an idea. Why not? Why not try to grow okra in the strange, tumultuous year that is 2020? I had low expectations but nothing to lose.

I found a few different spots in the busy yard to tuck in seeds. I removed two bricks from the patio, added dirt, and planted seeds. I put some in pots & some in an unused bed. Well damned if they didn’t grow! And what a pretty plant. I had no idea what they’d look like. Here’s the two plants in the patio in August in front of the permanent black-eyed susans bed.

Then they got beautiful flowers, that each lasted only one day. The flowers alone were worth it. Here’s one from the ground plant & one from a pot.

From the blooms grow the okra pod, one to a bloom. And they grow fast. I harvested 2 and oh yes, I cooked (diced & oven roasted with a little olive oil) and ate my okra, scanty though they were.😀

You have to see how the okra pods grows. Isn’t it wild? Upside down!

The plants are growing tall & a little gawky but when they don’t have enough sun that’s typical. Here’s the patio ones today. I cut down the susans the other day; I don’t like messy, spent flowers.

Yesterday I doubled my “harvest” and picked four okra. My oh my, we feast now.😀 I joke, but I really do think they’re beautiful. And I absolutely want to plant okra seeds next year, if only for the plant itself. You just never know what direction good things might be coming from. Simple, good, happy things like a lovely plant that pleased me daily this summer.

13 thoughts on “Growin’ okra

  1. Markus + Micah

    There is no greater joy than eating food that you have grown. Congratulations. I hope you enjoyed them really well. We are not growing okra at the moment, but it is very common here in The Ph. People plant it all year, and you are right- the fruit looks crazy cool upside down like that.

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    1. Colette Post author

      Agreed on the virtues of home-grown; free food! Although I think I didn’t cook my little “harvest” quite long enough – too used to cooking frozen food okra from the store – but I’ll learn.

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  2. Pistachios

    I also like okra, but never thought about growing it, or even what the plant looks like. I’ll have to do some research to see if they can survive in my climate.
    I think it’s funny that you say they grow upside down – maybe we’re just eating them upside down 😛

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    1. Colette Post author

      Heh. What’s your climate like? We get 4 seasons here with summer hot & humid (long stretches of 90°+ days). If I’d had any idea how easy okra would be from seed no less I’d have done it sooner. I imagine they’d produce LOTS with better sun.

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  3. Cathy McMillan

    Enjoyed this blog about growing okra. We have a large garden and have 10 long rows of Clemson spineless okra. We sell a lot to folks who don’t have room to grow it or don’t want to . I have canned many jars of okra/tomatoes for a base for vegetable soup as well as freezing a lot of fried okra. We are about ready to mow it down for the year. I’ll leave several big stalks and let the seed pods dry. They are very nice spray painted silver or gold and used in seasonal dried floral arrangements.

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    1. Colette Post author

      You are ambitious for sure! I had no idea how big these plants get, taller than me & I’m not short. I’ll never have a spread like yours but I’m already thinking about next year…

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