Green/White Grass plant (part 2)

The first summer I blogged I posted a photo of this Green/white grass plant. There wouldn’t be any reason to revisit it except that particular post has had somewhat regular views over the last two years. I was confused at first; why would people care about that post? It must come up in searches and that brings people to the blog.

I’ve felt a little guilty about that, thinking if those readers were looking for useful information, they sure weren’t finding any in my post. Granted, it wasn’ t meant to be an informational post full of big Latin words and discussions of soil conditions, but yeesh, I didn’t even say what it was. I’m here to correct that. It’s a Silver Arrrow Grass plant. Grows 5-6′, needs full sun, and gets tall reddish blooms in late summer (which I always forget till I see them).

Here’s also a current photo of this gorgeous plant. Well, two photos. One for “context” and one a little closer. What you won’t see in the photo is dental floss but it’s there. About this time of year the whole plant starts flopping over, perhaps because it doesn’t get as much sun as it wants – I really don’t know –  so I use my go-to garden helper, dental floss, wrapping it around the perimeter once and knotting tightly. (You want to knot it tightly so birds don’t carry the floss away for nest-building. Also I was chastized last year by someone online saying that wildlife could choke on it basically. That sounded far-fetched to me, but I dutifully mention it in case it’s true.)

I love that this beauty basically takes care of itself. No fertilizing, no regularly trimming, just cutting it down in the late Fall when it browns. I remain forever impressed that a giant plant like this can just “disappear” over winter and return again every summer, starting from scratch. It’s like a magic bean!

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13 thoughts on “Green/White Grass plant (part 2)

  1. Sheila Moss

    Grasses are extremely hardy. My guess is the wilting due to the heat of summer, or has simply grown too tall to support it’s own weight. This one is very pretty and decorative. Does it ever have “blooms” or seed heads?

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    1. writerinsoul Post author

      Of course! Their gums! Um, several years ago I was putting out peanut butter for the birds/squirrels and one time I saw a squirrel sort of choking a little on it and was horrified – I started calling, “Drink some water! Drink some water!” as if it could understand the directive. (He did swallow the peanut butter and go on about his business.)

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      1. battlewagon13

        I was yelled at by my soon to be wife for thinking we could throw rice at the wedding. Apparently it causes stomach issues for birds. I asked her “does that mean there’s no birds in Asia where they grow it?” She married me anyway.

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  2. mariezhuikov

    I have a post that’s popular in a similar way. It’s called “How I Fought for my Mole.” It’s about removal of a facial mole (or in my case, nonremoval). I figured out it comes up in searches by people who are looking for info on how to kill moles in their yards (the furry animal kind of moles, not the facial kind). I hope in some strange way, my post makes them think twice about killing moles.

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    1. writerinsoul Post author

      Ha – I like that Marie. Yes, the title of your post lends itself to speculation. I was surprised anybody was getting led to my blog by “green/white grass plant.” Every time I’ve seen it viewed, I felt bad that they must be disappointed.

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    1. writerinsoul Post author

      Oh, at first I thought your comment was in response to the red flower Dipladenia and I was thinking WOW, that must be some flower! You’re right, George, cutting down isn’t the funnest part. I’ve tried to leave it stand all winter but instead it kind of “sheds” and drops brown pieces around and looks messy.

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  3. Pingback: Green & White Grass Plant gets a little help | WriterInSoul

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