Let’s fix up a bird cage thingie!

Two years ago while shopping I found a small decorative cage that was marked way down, under a buck. I was intrigued. It was obviously on sale because it was quite disfigured, like a giant had squeezed it in his paw-like hand. I wondered how it had gotten mangled, especially since it was made of strong metal. There was no way I could bend it back by my hand so I put it on the floor of the store aisle and stood on it, using my body weight to mostly realign the shape. (Wonder how that little display looked on the security cameras?)
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And what did I need a decorative birdcage for you ask? Well, when I saw it I had an idea I could put suet for wild birds in it, so squirrels and big greedy blackbirds couldn’t gobble up all of the treat. (There are fancy-schmancy suet holders you can buy for this purpose but given my thrifty nature, well…) And I did use it successfully for that purpose the first winter. The little birds were initially leery but they got the hang of it.

It wasn’t looking all that great now from its time outside, and if I was going to keep it, it would have to be nicer. A friend (and long-time supporter of this blog) recently offered me some bright aqua spray paint. I love the color aqua and was sure I could do something with it. So I used that to paint the cage proper and decorated the little metal bird on top with other leftover paint I had. I was obviously unconcerned with its plumage resembling any actual bird.
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The cute bird sold me on this cage

The cute bird sold me on this cage

The little door opens

The little door opens

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19 thoughts on “Let’s fix up a bird cage thingie!

  1. Deb

    My thought- moss on the bottom, fill with potting soil using moss up the sides to help hold the soil, and plant little plants (flowering or maybe herbs) through the holes. Voila- a hanging garden!

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  2. markbialczak

    My father used to make me climb a ladder all winter to place suet in a treeholder we had in our backyard on Long Island, so he could watch the birds feed through the sliding glass doors off the dining room, Colette. I hated that task in my Wonder Bread years. But I grew to love bird-watching because of it.

    Your realigned bargain cage was a great fix for the thieving squirrels and big birds, my friend. And the paint job is a smooth face lift. 😉

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    1. writerinsoul Post author

      Thanks. It’s funny how certain things get ruined for us because of how we experienced them in childhood. I despised scrubbing out the big birdbath with “babo” (although we called it that, it was a dated product name & not the actual one used). And now I maintain birdbaths myself – although much smaller & wouldn’t dream of using a harsh cleanser.

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      1. markbialczak

        Yeah, it’s amazing to me how we hold on to parts of the experience and let go of other less-attractive elements, Colette. Babo. Interesting. As for me, I can still remember having the task of pouring the bacon fat from the pan into the big jar in the garage all winter long, too, to make the suet.

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    1. writerinsoul Post author

      Thanks Van! To be honest, I have no idea what one is supposed to do with something like this. I mean a real bird would just fly out between the bars, right?! (Not that I’d ever want a bird in a cage). But the little kid in me loved the door with its little latch and that bird on top. I just like looking at it.

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      1. Angie Mc

        No picture, yet! I want to spend time this summer improving my picture taking skills so that would be a fun blog post. My son and I dressed up our “curb appeal” last summer after watching too much HGTV, lol.

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  3. Pingback: Let’s fix up a little wood table! | WriterInSoul

  4. Pingback: Finding a spot for the “bird cage thingie” | WriterInSoul

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